12 April 2019

UNAI Quiz: International Mother Earth Day

 
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Mother Earth is a common expression for the planet earth in a number of countries and regions, which reflects the interdependence that exists among human beings, other living species and the planet we all inhabit. The Earth and its ecosystems are our home. In order to achieve a just balance among the economic, social, and environmental needs of present and future generations, it is necessary to promote harmony with nature and the Earth.

International Mother Earth Day is celebrated to remind each of us that the Earth and its ecosystems provide us with life and sustenance.

This Day also recognizes a collective responsibility, as called for in the 1992 Rio Declaration, to promote harmony with nature and the Earth to achieve a just balance among the economic, social and environmental needs of present and future generations of humanity. International Mother Earth Day provides an opportunity to raise public awareness around the world to the challenges regarding the well-being of the planet and all the life it supports.

During the commemoration of International Mother Earth Day, the Ninth Interactive Dialogue of the General Assembly on Harmony with Nature will be held on 22 April 2019 in the Trusteeship Council Chamber. The 2019 Interactive Dialogue of the General Assembly on Harmony with Nature will encourage all countries and relevant stakeholders to further promote the integration of collective climate action in education taking into account innovative paradigms, concerning present and future challenges in the design and implementation of nationally determined contributions, adaptation planning, long-term low greenhouse gas emissions and climate resilient development strategies, and climate policies.

Test your knowledge on Mother Earth now!

Correct! According to UN Environment, to achieve the goal of limiting climate change to 1.5°C, countries would have to increase their level of ambition by five times. Global emissions have reached historic levels at 53.5 GtCO2e, after a three-year period of stabilization, with no signs of peaking. Additionally, Only 57 countries (representing 60 percent of global emissions) are on track to meet their commitments by 2030. If the emissions gap is not closed by 2030, it is extremely unlikely that the 2°C temperature goal can still be reached.

The correct answer is C. According to UN Environment, to achieve the goal of limiting climate change to 1.5°C, countries would have to increase their level of ambition by five times. Global emissions have reached historic levels at 53.5 GtCO2e, after a three-year period of stabilization, with no signs of peaking. Additionally, Only 57 countries (representing 60 percent of global emissions) are on track to meet their commitments by 2030. If the emissions gap is not closed by 2030, it is extremely unlikely that the 2°C temperature goal can still be reached.

Incorrect. The correct answer is C. According to UN Environment, to achieve the goal of limiting climate change to 1.5°C, countries would have to increase their level of ambition by five times. Global emissions have reached historic levels at 53.5 GtCO2e, after a three-year period of stabilization, with no signs of peaking. Additionally, Only 57 countries (representing 60 percent of global emissions) are on track to meet their commitments by 2030. If the emissions gap is not closed by 2030, it is extremely unlikely that the 2°C temperature goal can still be reached.

Incorrect. The correct answer is C. According to the FAO, deforestation is the second-leading cause of climate change after burning fossil fuels and accounts for nearly 20 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions — more than the world’s entire transport sector. As underscored at the Paris Climate Agreement in 2015, forests and trees play a crucial role in determining the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Acting as carbon sinks, they absorb the equivalent of roughly 2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide each year. 

Incorrect. The correct answer is C. According to the FAO, deforestation is the second-leading cause of climate change after burning fossil fuels and accounts for nearly 20 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions — more than the world’s entire transport sector. As underscored at the Paris Climate Agreement in 2015, forests and trees play a crucial role in determining the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Acting as carbon sinks, they absorb the equivalent of roughly 2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide each year. 

Correct! According to the FAO, deforestation is the second-leading cause of climate change after burning fossil fuels and accounts for nearly 20 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions — more than the world’s entire transport sector. As underscored at the Paris Climate Agreement in 2015, forests and trees play a crucial role in determining the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Acting as carbon sinks, they absorb the equivalent of roughly 2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide each year. 

Incorrect. The correct answer is B. As much as 40 percent of the ocean is heavily affected by pollution, depleted fisheries, loss of coastal habitats and other human activities. The global share of marine fish stocks that are within biologically sustainable levels declined from 90 per cent in 1974 to 69 per cent in 2013. Studies at open ocean and coastal sites around the world show that current levels of marine acidity have increased by about 26 per cent on average since the start of the Industrial Revolution.

Incorrect. The correct answer is B. As much as 40 percent of the ocean is heavily affected by pollution, depleted fisheries, loss of coastal habitats and other human activities. The global share of marine fish stocks that are within biologically sustainable levels declined from 90 per cent in 1974 to 69 per cent in 2013. Studies at open ocean and coastal sites around the world show that current levels of marine acidity have increased by about 26 per cent on average since the start of the Industrial Revolution.

Correct! As much as 40 percent of the ocean is heavily affected by pollution, depleted fisheries, loss of coastal habitats and other human activities. The global share of marine fish stocks that are within biologically sustainable levels declined from 90 per cent in 1974 to 69 per cent in 2013. Studies at open ocean and coastal sites around the world show that current levels of marine acidity have increased by about 26 per cent on average since the start of the Industrial Revolution.

Correct!  According to a 2019 FAO report, when it comes to livestock around a quarter of breeds are at risk of extinction and more than half of fish stocks are at risk of extinction. Species that contribute to the food ecosystem, such as pollinators, soil organisms and natural enemies of pests, are under severe threat. Examples include bees, butterflies, bats and birds. Human intervention is overwhelmingly at fault, says the report. Examples include the way land water are used and managed; pollution; overexploitation and overharvesting; climate change; and population growth and urbanization.

Incorrect. The correct answer is A. According to a 2019 FAO report, when it comes to livestock around a quarter of breeds are at risk of extinction and more than half of fish stocks are at risk of extinction. Species that contribute to the food ecosystem, such as pollinators, soil organisms and natural enemies of pests, are under severe threat. Examples include bees, butterflies, bats and birds. Human intervention is overwhelmingly at fault, says the report. Examples include the way land water are used and managed; pollution; overexploitation and overharvesting; climate change; and population growth and urbanization.

Incorrect. The correct answer is A. According to a 2019 FAO report, when it comes to livestock around a quarter of breeds are at risk of extinction and more than half of fish stocks are at risk of extinction. Species that contribute to the food ecosystem, such as pollinators, soil organisms and natural enemies of pests, are under severe threat. Examples include bees, butterflies, bats and birds. Human intervention is overwhelmingly at fault, says the report. Examples include the way land water are used and managed; pollution; overexploitation and overharvesting; climate change; and population growth and urbanization.

Incorrect. The correct answer is C. According to UN Environment, to achieve the goal of limiting climate change to 1.5°C, countries would have to increase their level of ambition by five times. Global emissions have reached historic levels at 53.5 GtCO2e, after a three-year period of stabilization, with no signs of peaking. Additionally, Only 57 countries (representing 60 percent of global emissions) are on track to meet their commitments by 2030. If the emissions gap is not closed by 2030, it is extremely unlikely that the 2°C temperature goal can still be reached.

Incorrect. The correct answer is C. According to UN Environment, to achieve the goal of limiting climate change to 1.5°C, countries would have to increase their level of ambition by five times. Global emissions have reached historic levels at 53.5 GtCO2e, after a three-year period of stabilization, with no signs of peaking. Additionally, Only 57 countries (representing 60 percent of global emissions) are on track to meet their commitments by 2030. If the emissions gap is not closed by 2030, it is extremely unlikely that the 2°C temperature goal can still be reached.

Correct! According to UN Environment, to achieve the goal of limiting climate change to 1.5°C, countries would have to increase their level of ambition by five times. Global emissions have reached historic levels at 53.5 GtCO2e, after a three-year period of stabilization, with no signs of peaking. Additionally, Only 57 countries (representing 60 percent of global emissions) are on track to meet their commitments by 2030. If the emissions gap is not closed by 2030, it is extremely unlikely that the 2°C temperature goal can still be reached.

Correct! By 2018, a total of 108 countries had national policies and initiatives relevant to sustainable consumption and production.

Incorrect. The correct answer is B. By 2018, a total of 108 countries had national policies and initiatives relevant to sustainable consumption and production.

Incorrect. The correct answer is B. By 2018, a total of 108 countries had national policies and initiatives relevant to sustainable consumption and production.